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Another big expense

April 14th, 2017 at 02:51 pm

Well, I've been making good progress this year on decreasing debt, but I'm going to backslide a bit in the service of preserving my health.

I've been struggling with a growing fatigue problem for about 4 years. The last time I remember being my "old self" who woke up early and easily full of energy was about 5 years ago. I remember going out and taking lots of long walks early mornings during the times I was out in Los Angeles helping out with my mom during her final year; I remember having a job that required me to be at the office across town at 8:30 am and not struggling with it. Then I remember starting to work at a manufacturing plant in April 2012 and having my asthma get massively worse within 3 weeks, which interfered with my ability to exercise, and gradually I began to struggle to be able to get in to work at 9 a.m.--not because I would wake up late, but because I would wake up at 6:30 and just zone out over a few cups of coffee until making myself get into the shower. The asthma eventually came under control two years ago after I was put on Flovent, but my energy never returned.

Lately I've been struggling at the other end of the day as well--if I want to be out after 7 pm, I am often too exhausted to do so. Not that I am falling asleep that early--just being nonproductive browsing social media because I don't have the energy to go out more than one or two nights a week.

I had my doctor run tests and she ran the standard panels, but my tests all come back normal.

Then 3 years ago, during the 6 months I was unemployed, I went to hear a chiropractor talk on thyroid issues, since I suspect this may be part of the problem. My mother was on Synthroid, and my sister has been on it since age 19, so clearly it runs in the family. That chiropractor ran a test for thyroid antibodies--a test that my doctor did not run because it is not part of the standard thyroid test panel. That test showed that my antibodies were out of range, indicating that my body is in essence attacking my own thyroid (a condition known as Hashimoto's Thyroiditis). The doctor recommended going on a gluten free diet (so I switched from being vegan to going gluten free, not that the two are incompatable but I just couldn't manage too many dietary restrictions at one time) and paid out of pocket for periodic thyroid antibody tests. When I brought the topic up to my doctor, she gave me the standard allopathic medicine doctor response of "there's really nothing to do but wait until your thyroid levels go out of range and then use Synthroid.") The chiropractor also had another program of treatment he recommended--but it was mostly out of pocket except for the lab testing, and I couldn't afford it at the time.

By going gluten free, I had seen my antibody levels gradually go down. But this winter I felt the fatigue increase, and when I had another test done in March, it showed an increase in my levels again. They're still significantly lower than the first time I was tested (which to me is evidence for the autoimmune nature and the role of gluten in the disease), but this was the first time i 3 years that my levels rose rather than fell.

Then 3 weeks ago I was on facebook and I saw a talk by another chiropractor being given on Saturday. I went to that talk and signed up for a consult with him. I also knew of a third chiropractor who treats Hashimoto's who is actually on the list of recommended practitioners listed by Isabella Wentz, author of "The Hashimoto's Protocol" and I made an appointment to see him as well.

So after all of this, I've decided that now is the time to get my energy back, because that is what enables my ability to accomplish every other goal in my life. Having met twice now with each of the three doctors, I've decided to go to the one who is on Wentz's list of recommended practioners. Yes, it will involve a big out of pocket cost, since again, only the lab tests are covered by insurance. But I'm not making progress on the other goals in my life in the way that I want because of my lack of energy. I'll be going for a more extensive panel of tests next week--and if there is anything more serious going on that would require an internist, that should be shown by the tests as well (in which case I need to hurry up to find a new internist as my last one died in November).

I brought along my last few sets of bloodwork results to the exams, and the doctor who I have chosen noted a recurring anomaly in another marker that no doctor had ever commented on before, and told me what it indicated, which fits with some other information I have from "genetic genie" interpretations of my 23andme results (basically a methylation anomaly). That, plus his answer to another "test" question I gave to my doctors to understand more about their perspective, gave me some confidence that this doctor will help get me on the path to restoring my energy--since right now, as the song goes, "my 'get up and go' has got up and went." And that, frankly would be worth incurring another 2.5K expense (especially in the least invasive way. I've done a lot of reading about functional medicine in the past few years, and have come to believe that while allopathic (traditional) medicine is the best route to treating acute conditions, for autoimmune and many chronic conditions, you are best off starting with a functional medicine approach which may entail lifestyle changes to forestall further problems rather than waiting until the problem becomes bad and then sticking you on drugs.

4 Responses to “Another big expense”

  1. PatientSaver Says:

    You're definitely doing the right thing. I know you must be very debt-averse having worked so hard to deal with past debts, but personal health comes before anything else. I myself am guilty of letting certain health issues go (my numb toes from pulled hamstring) after trying 2 things with neurologist who seems to have run out of ideas.

    It sounds like you've found a pretty sharp doctor and I hope they can help you.

    I'm sorry you're not vegan anymore but I understand the rationale. When I go to Easter dinner tomorrow, I will not be staying vegan; just too hard and too tempting.

  2. Carol Says:

    Dido, I am very interested in what you are doing. I have noticed a definite downturn in my own pep, energy, especially after two asthma episodes. Hoping you've found an answer for yourself!

  3. Dido Says:

    Thanks, PS. I'm sorry your neurologist is running out of ideas.

    Carol, yes, that asthma is a bear. Having it intensify during the two years I worked at the manufacturing plant definitely correlated with the decrease in energy. Hopefully I can turn it around now.

    It's one reason I like functional medicine, even though some sites on "science based medicine" dismiss it because it insists on focusing on individual differences in response. To me, it is just the difference between twentieth century and twenty-first century science: it the 1900s, the sciences got very good at doing experiments to identify main effects and basic interactions. I'm the 2000s, the sciences (some more quickly than others) are all moving towards a more systematic understanding that allows not only for main effects and interactions, but also the effects of feedback loops as well as even greater numbers of variables (which 20th century science tries to control, leading laboratory studies not to always apply in the world outside the lab).

  4. rob62521 Says:

    I am sorry to learn of your fatigue. I know with asthma, I tend to get overtired some times, so I can only imagine if you have asthma as well as thyroid issues how exhausted you must feel all the time. Hope you can find some solutions.

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